Breakthrough Graduate Scholarship Program At IMU For 2023

You are currently reading about the fully funded IMU Breakout Graduate Fellowship Program scholarship in Germany. As you read on, please pay close attention because I will be going over all the information about the IMU Program and its scholarship. Additionally, all the details, advantages, and a summary of the scholarship will be covered here. Go on reading!

Applications are being accepted for the IMU Breakout Graduate Fellowship Program right now. This article will go into great detail about this scholarship program, its advantages, and how to apply.

The IMU Breakout Graduate Fellowship Program 2022–2023 offers fully funded PhD fellowships to overseas candidates. The International Mathematical Union Scholarship, valued up to USD 10,000 annually, pays for education costs as well as accommodation, transportation, and daily living costs.

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The International Mathematical Union, the donors, and The Friends of the International Mathematical Union anticipate that the fellowship will benefit those selected for it in the long run as well as aid in the training of the next generation of mathematicians.

Professional mathematicians are invited to recommend exceptionally bright and mathematically gifted students from developing countries who wish to pursue a doctorate in a developing nation, including their own.

Candidates must actively want to pursue a career in mathematics research and teaching and have a track record of consistently high academic achievement.

Summary of the Scholarship and all Date Information

  • PhD educational background
  • An organization is the International Mathematical Union.
  • You can study in any nation.
  • A focus area for opportunities is mathematics.
  • Four years total for the program
  • The cutoff date is May 31, 2023.

Coverage of all perks, including scholarships

The financing for the IMU Breakout Graduate Fellowship Program may total up to USD 10,000 annually:

  • Tuition paid in full
  • The cost of lodging
  • Travel costs to the destination institution (if different from the home country)
  • The cost of living in the country where the student will pursue his or her PhD studies will be used to calculate basic living expenses.

The IMU Breakout Graduate Fellowship Program’s eligibility requirements

Candidates must fulfill each of the requirements given below in order to be eligible for the IMU Breakout Graduate Fellowship Program:

  • The necessary language is English.
  • Every nation on earth is qualified.
  • For the Scholarship, students are not eligible to apply.
  • Mathematicians in the workforce (including those who have superannuated, but continue to mentor
  • young students). It is ideal if the nominee has received mentoring from the proposer.
  • The student must be a citizen of and a resident of a developing nation.
  • The student must either already be enrolled in a PhD program in a university or research institution located in a developing nation, or they must have received pre-acceptance to enter a doctoral program
  • there in the first academic year following selection.
  • There is no maximum age for the student.
  • Particular encouragement is given to female students to put themselves forward.
  • Depending on how well the recipient is progressing, the fellowship will be awarded for one year at a time and renewed annually.
  • After the recipient completes the PhD program or after four years, whichever comes first, the fellowship will end.

How to Apply for the IMU Graduate Scholarship for Breakthrough Research

Please follow the instructions below to apply for the IMU Breakout Graduate Fellowship Program:

  • Create a profile on the platform of the International Mathematical Union.
    the online application form in its entirety
  • The following materials should be ready for the selecting process: (Only PDF-formatted files may be uploaded.)
  • Indication of Nominator
  • a scan of the nominee’s (student’s) passport
  • a letter of pre-acceptance from the PhD program.
  • Total requested spending budget
  • a PhD supervisor’s resume
  • Research Project
  • A total of two letters of recommendation, none of which may be from the candidate.
  • transcripts of the student’s coursework, which are certified copies (i.e., stamped by the university):

A) BSc or an equivalent degree.

B) A science master’s degree or its equivalent

  • CV of the candidate
  • Motivational letter for nomination, research project, and student’s long-term goals
  • Statement of the Nominator
  • Statement from the PhD Supervisor
  • Statement of the Nominee (student)

Official Mathunion website

Please check the official website for more details about the IMU Breakout Graduate Fellowship Program:

https://www.mathunion.org/cdc/scholarshipsgraduate-scholarships/imu-breakout-graduate-fellowship-program

The Commission for Developing Countries (CDC) and Its Forerunners: A Brief History

In order to carry on the expanding and fruitful work previously done by CDE and DSCG, the adhering organizations of the IMU decided in August 2009 to merge its two existing commissions working on projects for developing countries, the Commission on Development and Exchanges (CDE) and the Developing Countries Strategy Group (DCSG), into the Commission for Developing Countries (CDC).

All of IMU’s past and present initiatives and projects to promote mathematicians and mathematics in the poor world are now “under one roof” thanks to the CDC, which officially launched in January 2011.

Predecessors

In order to carry on the expanding and fruitful work previously done by CDE and DSCG, the adhering organizations of the IMU decided in August 2009 to merge its two existing commissions working on projects for developing countries, the Commission on Development and Exchanges (CDE) and the Developing Countries Strategy Group (DCSG), into the Commission for Developing Countries (CDC).

All of IMU’s past and present initiatives and projects to promote mathematicians and mathematics in the poor world are now “under one roof” thanks to the CDC, which officially launched in January 2011.

In 1971, the initial organized measures were implemented.

The IMU Executive Committee decided to form an international group in 1971 in order to help it in two ways: first, by advising other international organizations—both governmental and nongovernmental—on initiatives meant to promote the growth of mathematics in developing nations; and second, by suggesting to the Executive Committee potential agreements between already-existing international organizations.

The African Mathematical Union (AMU) was founded at the All African Mathematical Conference in Morocco in 1976, and as a result, the IMU was successful in securing funding from the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA).

Exchanges and Development Commission (CDE)

In 1978, the General Assembly created the Commission on Development and Exchanges (CDE) as an IMU subcommittee. By offering funds for individual study trips, travel grants to conferences in underdeveloped countries, and travel grants to conferences in developed nations, CDE aimed to assist mathematicians in developing and economically underprivileged nations. The Grants Selection Committee of the CDC has been in charge of this award program since January 2011.

In relation to the CDC

As a commission of the International Mathematical Union, the CDC was founded in 2011. (IMU).

The International Mathematical Union (IMU) has actively supported and cooperated with math groups and individuals in developing nations since the early 1970s. Examples of support activities include funding for conferences and research trips, as well as volunteer lectures, team research projects, and gifts. Previously, the Developing Countries Strategy Group and the Commission for Development and Exchanges (CDE) of the IMU were in charge of these functions (DCSG).

The preceding ten years have seen IMU pay more attention to the mathematical requirements of developing and underdeveloped nations. The IMU and its affiliated organizations decided to consolidate the CDE and the DCSG into a single commission, the Commission for Developing Countries, in August 2009 as a result of this increased focus (CDC).

The General Assembly conference in Bangalore in 2010 saw the acceptance of the CDC Terms of Reference and the election of the CDC leadership for the years 2011 to 2014. As a result, the CDC was activated on January 1, 2011, and its inaugural meeting took place on January 30 and 31, 2011, in Berlin, Germany.

The Secretariat of the International Mathematical Union has had a permanent location in Berlin, Germany, since January 2011. The IMU Secretariat is located at the Weierstrass Institute in Berlin, Germany (WIAS).

Under the direction of the IMU Executive Committee and the CDC, the IMU Secretariat manages the IMU’s (and CDC’s) daily operations and offers assistance for the Commission for Developing Countries’ activities (CDC). The State of Berlin and the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) each provide financing to the secretariat’s operations.

With a focus on continuing the excellent work of CDE and DSCG, the CDC’s mandate is to oversee all IMU efforts supporting mathematics in the developing countries.

The CDC administers the Grants Programs for Mathematicians and the Volunteer Lecture Program in addition to taking part in the activities listed below in line with different facets of its mission:

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